eric hoffman personal fitness
eric@ehpersonalfitness.com
Phone: 312.498.4106

   
   
 

1. How long will it take to see results?
2. How many days a week do I need to work out?
3. How can I ever find the time to work out?
4. I hate to diet, so I'll never be in good shape, right?
5. Will lifting weights make me big?
6. I've reached a plateau in my training. How do I jumpstart my workouts to achieve results?
7. How many calories should I be eating a day?
8. How can I sustain my motivation and stick with it this time?

   
 

1. How long will it take to see results?

This will depend on the frequency and intensity of your workouts and how closely you follow a sound nutritional plan. Are you getting enough sleep to maximize your efforts? Your current level of skill and conditioning and to some extent genetic disposition will affect the rate at which you get into shape. Have you ever been in great shape before? Most importantly, if you make training a priority and really immerse yourself in a healthy lifestyle you will be pleased with the rate of your success. For most people this can be achieved in about 3 to 6 months.

   
 

2. How many days a week do I need to work out?

This depends on the goals that you have set for yourself. Typically, to begin, 3 times a week is a good start, especially if you're living a somewhat sedentary lifestyle. As your shape and conditioning improve, you may want to increase to 5 days per week. A combination of weights, cardio, and some yoga based stretching can be very effective.

   
 

3. How can I ever find the time to work out?

Indeed every one of my clients leads a busy life. Yet they find the time to train. In fact, the busiest of them are the most consistent ones. They simply have made it a priority and a part of their routine along with their other responsibilities. With the stressful demands we place on ourselves, we cannot afford to not take care of ourselves.

   
 

4. I hate to diet, so I'll never be in good shape, right?

Good news, you don't have to diet. You do have to make good food choices, and it isn't about deprivation. Doing your best to eliminate processed and packaged foods by replacing them with fruits, vegetables, lean meats, and fish will go a long way and be your greatest ally to changing your body.

   
 

5. Will lifting weights make me big?

It rarely happens with women. The exception is the genetically superior athlete who trains for a living. Weight training is essential in burning fat and toning and shaping your body. Nothing else will be as effective in doing this for you.

   
 

6. I've reached a plateau in my training. How do I jumpstart my workouts to achieve results?

We often reach plateaus, when workouts fail to produce the desired results. You may be over training and that will require rest. Your body will tell you when it's time for a break. Persistent fatigue and lack of energy are physical signs. Mental fatigue and irritability are emotional signs. Knowing when to take time off can keep you moving towards your goals. When your workout becomes a little too routine change it and almost always bump up the intensity. A great way to do this is to add some circuit and/or interval training. This variety will certainly challenge you and push you to a higher level of fitness.

   
 

7. How many calories should I be eating a day?

I really think calorie counting is a poor way to go about changing your nutritional habits. It's narrow, vague, and ultimately ineffective. Begin by honestly looking at your food choices on a daily basis. Note the protein, carbohydrate, and fat grams in some of the foods you eat. How about the sugar grams? Are you getting some protein with each meal? I think Barry Sears (Mastering the Zone) got it right when he suggests processed and packaged foods are the enemy. We simply need to eat more low-density carbohydrates, like fruit and fiber-rich vegetables, lean proteins, and monounsaturated fats. These foods don't make us fat and are loaded with essential nutrients. Furthermore, he suggests we can and should be eating some of these foods together several times a day. They are naturally low in calories, so eat up. Deprivation is not an option. Your energy level will improve, and you should feel better. I don't believe simply restricting your calories will do this for you.

   
 

8. How can I sustain my motivation and stick with it this time?

There are certainly countless reasons why we should take the time to take care of ourselves, yet many of us don't. We pursue a better quality of life and yet neglect our health. This is a contradiction. I like to look at it this way: My life and my health are not separate things. Better health will improve the quality of your life. Be patient. Find activities you enjoy. Know there is no finish line when it comes to your health. A healthy lifestyle can and should become a part of who you are, something you pursue everyday. Begin now, and enjoy the journey.

   
   
               

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Eric Hoffmann Personal Fitness Systems, LLC
John Hancock Center
875 N. Michigan Ave
Chicago, IL, 60611

Email: eric@ehpersonalfitness.com | Phone: 312.498.4106

Copyright © 2013 Eric Hoffmann Personal Fitness Systems, LLC